| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn

Southfield : News

132 Southfield Articles | Page: | Show All

4 things to know about the state of Oakland County

L. Brooks Patterson talks advanced vehicle tech, millennials, Pontiac, and bringing back shop class.

Farmers market to offer winter produce cooking demonstrations and recipes

Many people may not associate the icy chill of Michigan winters with fresh produce, but Oakland County is working to change that.

Metro Detroit's independent local news outlets making the best of a bad time in journalism

For the area's unconventional news outlets, 2016 was actually a good yearfor some, their best yet.

8 ways to get out and enjoy Metro Detroit this holiday break

Don't spend the whole week staring at your phone.

Q&A: Victoria Byrd Olivier on Detroit Future City and green infrastructure

How does green infrastructure fit into the work of Detroit Future City? 

How Metro Detroit's car-oriented suburbs are implementing a 'new American dream'

Is the auto-dominated, cul-de-sac, sprawl suburb permanently losing its hold on the American imagination? Sterling Heights, Troy and Southfield are planning on it.

Oakland County joins PACE program to promote energy efficiency for businesses

PACE offsets the upfront costs of energy efficiency upgrades through a special property tax assessment.

Profile: Megan Ackroyd prepares to steward Scottish bakery into third generation

She's making sure that her family business sticks around for generations to come.

Ford C3 grant to Lawrence Tech aims to cut affordable housing cost in half

Lawrence Technological University has received a $25,000 Ford College Community Challenge grant that could revolutionize the production of affordable housing – starting with one new home in Pontiac.
 
The grant will help fund the construction of HOUSE02, a proof of concept home that will use the techniques developed over the past two years by LTU architecture professors Scott Shall, Jim Stevens, Ayodh Kamath, and Brian Oltrogge, and LTU architecture graduate students.
 
The goal is to build a home at a cost of $50 to $65 per square foot. That would put the cost of a modest, 1,000-square-foot home at $50,000 to $65,000 – not the $110,000 to $150,000 achieved through traditional construction methods, Shall said.
 
The techniques will make it more likely for affordable housing to attract financing on a large scale, as well. For a video of Lawrence Tech students and faculty discussing this issue, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8demrSIp0R0&feature=youtu.be.
 
The LTU professors and students worked with Habitat for Humanity of Oakland County on the research.
 
In addition to the Ford grant, an anonymous philanthropist has donated $6,000 and a city lot in Pontiac for the construction of HOUSE02.
 
“We’ve been working with students and professionals to figure out how digital fabrication can more rigorously inform the building delivery process used to make affordable housing,” Shall said. “Through our research, we have found ways to use computer simulation, digital fabrication, and products such as structural insulating panels and reclaimed material to reduce the cost and environmental footprint of affordable housing, as well as the time required to build the home.”
 
The Ford College Community Challenge (Ford C3) is a grant competition launched in 2008 when Ford Motor Company Fund reached out to its national network of colleges and universities and invited them to compete for grants based on local sustainability projects. Ford C3 works with partners in higher education that are focused on the critical areas of business, design and engineering. Ford C3 is designed to use school and company resources in creative ways, challenging schools and students to design projects that address pressing community needs and make more relevant connections with students. Ford C3 differs from many traditional college grant programs by requiring significant student input, involvement and leadership from beginning to end. As a result, winning proposals have a distinct student perspective on what it means to have a sustainable community. Ford C3 is an educational initiative of Ford Motor Company Fund, the philanthropic arm of Ford Motor Company. More details about the program and previous winners can be found at https://www.fordblueovalnetwork.org/ford-college-community-challenge.
 
Lawrence Technological University, www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 100 universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.
 
About Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services
Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services works with community and global partners to advance driving safety, education and community life. Ford Motor Company Fund has operated for more than 65 years with ongoing funding from Ford Motor Company. Ford Driving Skills for Life is free, interactive, hands-on safety training focused on skill development and driving techniques, while addressing inexperience, distractions and impaired driving. Innovation in education is encouraged through Ford Blue Oval Scholars, Ford Driving Dreams, Ford Next Generation Learning and other innovative programs that enhance high school learning and provide college scholarships and university grants. The Ford Volunteer Corps enlists more than 30,000 Ford employees and retirees each year to work on local projects that strengthen their communities and improve people’s lives in more than 40 countries around the world. For more information, visit http://community.ford.com.
 
About The Ford College Community Challenge
Through the Ford College Community Challenge, Ford Motor Company Fund aims to support colleges and universities as they work with students to design and develop tangible community projects that address critical local needs in new ways, with a focus on helping the community become a more sustainable place to work and live.

Oakland County's CISO captures top IT award

Oakland County’s Chief Information Security Officer Chris Burrows is Michigan’s IT Professional of the Year, County Executive L. Brooks Patterson announced today. That’s according to Michigan Government Management Information Sciences (MI-GMIS) who bestowed the award on Burrows. The award recognizes outstanding individuals who advance and support the use of technology within government to improve efficiency and customer service.

“Oakland County is consistently ranked among the most digitally-advanced counties in America by the Center for Digital Government,” Patterson said. “Chris is an integral part of the team that has helped Oakland County stay on the leading edge of developments in IT. He truly deserves this award.”

Burrows joined Oakland County in 2013 bringing more than a quarter century of experience from the private sector including in risk management, information security, and IT operations. In a few short years, he has created Oakland County’s first IT risk and security program. Plus, he helped implement CySAFE, a free IT risk assessment tool Oakland County makes available to other governments and businesses in the cloud. CySAFE has been downloaded in all 50 states.

Burrows also has provided leadership and guidance as a security advocate for other Michigan counties seeking to build or enhance their IT security including Washtenaw, Wayne, Macomb, Livingston and Monroe. He is working with local universities including Oakland University and Walsh College to help them identify relevant content for their cyber security programs. In addition, he is creating his own course called “Current Issues in Cyber Security” which he will begin teaching at Walsh College.

“Chris is an outstanding addition to our IT Department at Oakland County,” said Deputy County Executive and CIO Phil Bertolini. “His innovative thinking, leadership, and willingness to help all those in the government, university and business communities make him worthy of this award.”

Burrows, 45, lives in Commerce Township with his wife Heather and two children. He holds a MBA from Lawrence Technological University, BSBA from Central Michigan University, along with numerous technical certifications including a CISSP (Certified Information System Security Professional).

For more information about MI-GMIS and the IT Professional of the Year award, go to MI-GMIS.org.
 

New bus routes, barber shops: September development news round-up

It's been another busy month for development news in metropolitan Detroit. Let's catch up.

Big gets bigger: September 8 innovation news roundup

Growth in underwear, sewing and automotive. Also, Bill Clinton loves Detroit!

Innovation news roundup, September 1, 2016

China invests in Michigan, a Troy-based auto company buys German, two new data facilities rise in Southfield and more in this week's innovation news roundup.

Zen and the art of motorcycle sales: Weekly regional business news roundup

Expansions in motorcycle sales, a law firm and your favorite (maybe?) pizza chain. Plus, Silicon Valley startups set up in Ann Arbor.

Bold plan for Northland mall unveiled

Parks, a pond, housing, retail, a hotel and more are envisioned for the 125-acre site.
132 Southfield Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts